Seiyo Wine + Sushi Bar

South End, Boston, MA

About .......................................................................................

New wine boutique and sushi restaurant
Completion: 2005

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Credits   ..............................................................................................................

  • Project Team
  • Hansy Better Barraza
  • Anthony J. Piermarini
  • Michael Beaman
  • Code Consulting
  • Albert Costa Architects
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Ibrahim + Ibrahim
  • Lighting Design
  • Light This!
  • Photography
  • John Horner

Overview   ..............................................................................................................

The concept for Seiyo Wine + Sushi Bar embraces the notion of transient beauty and the natural changes that occur through the aging process. The space serves a fusion of eastern and western culinary traditions. Wine is valued for its ability to age gracefully; alternatively, sushi is always prepared and served fresh. The strategy nests one tradition within another, creating a synergy between the two.

The project is composed of a complex mix of architectural elements, each playing an individual role yet serving to bring together a larger whole. Working with the modularity of the planks, the Brazilian cherry wood floorboards run up the walls and create ceiling areas to conceal mechanical systems and define the Sushi space. In a similar strategy that accentuates inherent material properties, the millwork is composed of refined industrial parallel laminated veneer beams floated over long spans to create counters, bar tops, and tables. The display for various types of wine is set against the historic brick walls, where a structural lattice suspends the wine cases. Two parallel rows of steel bars are organized on a diagonal grid, wine cases that have anthropomorphic qualities, are inserted into this lattice to complete the 3 dimensional system. A rationalist “wine cave” is foiled through a liner of perforated metal, intended to collect used corks from the various social events and wine tastings; similar to other urban wall markings, graffiti, and tags, traces of the individual contribute to transform the whole. The design of the space will continuously change through its ongoing use.